“The Sauce of Manliness.”

"That classy classic condiment of choice for so many Britonic breakfast munchers, all those who love that unique tomato vinegarette enjoy this classy ad for the  nations tastiest gunge. This was a Spec Ad made for the 2nd year of Bournemouth University Film Production and Cinematography (BA). Produced by William Geraghty and Directed by Henry Fothergill."

This was filmed in one day on a Canon 5D Mk III in a tiny studio in our film department. The biggest mistake in this was using hot lights around food, in particular the cheese thins. After setting up for the first take the actor was unable to peel any of the cheese because the stack had all melted into one solid block, which of course we reset to get the shot used in the film, but not before the smell of sweating melting cheese had filled the studio, soaked into our clothes and dug itself deep into our noses. A lot of apologies were given to the poor schmucks using the studio the next day.

One of the most fun parts of the shoot however was the food preparation itself, all of the food in the film was real food. It was interesting trying to cook a 20lb steak to look aesthetically pleasing and grilling sausages for just the right amount of crisping on the top. We did use a couple of tricks like having a spray bottle of water to make the parsley look fresher and adding oil to the steak to make it look freshly cooked.

The pack shot proved most problematic of the whole shoot however as we couldn't move the lights to give enough brightness to the logo without also causing some nasty looking reflections AND rather unhelpfully HP sauce printed their best before dates on the white bottle topper. Unfortunately neither were something we could rectify on set or in camera so I took to photoshop afterwards. Because I have limited knowledge of After Effects I decided to export the packshot as an image sequence and correct it frame by frame, even though it's more arduous of a process I thought I would get a better result in our constricted timeframe on more familliar software. – Our alloted editing time was only 3 days long –  In the end I don't think it's noticeable that it has been doctored, or that I did a similar process to hide a line in the studio wall behind the actor. I think in total I corrected 175 separate frames.